Sunflowervillager's Blog

Growing into community

Kickoff Meeting + Mystery Seeds! May 3, 2017

We had a great board kickoff meeting today! Four of us met this evening. It was cool to have three awesome supporters meet each other at last. We discussed where things are with Sunflower Village right now. We’re working on our strategy to apply for nonprofit status, and we’re looking for people who are interested in Sunflower Village, whether they’d like to think about becoming a villager or just have an interest in intentional communities, economic justice, sustainable living, or tiny houses.

Our next meeting is in June, but we’re already planning the conversations we’re going to have between now and then, about nonprofits, organizational structure, and sustainability.

On an earthy note, yesterday I finally got my hands in the dirt and did some planting. I have seeds set for basil, Purple Cherokee tomatoes, Brown Berry cherry tomatoes, coriander, and dill from the landlord I had in Amherst. But best of all are the mystery sunflowers. I saved the seed on the head of a sunflower I grew in 2015, but I have no idea which variety it was. I’m excited to see how they and all the Sunflower Village seeds I’ve been planting since then bloom this year. Mystery Sunflower Seeds planted 5-2-17.jpg

 

New Perspectives January 24, 2017

Filed under: geography,nonprofit development,organization — Saera @ 11:03 pm

I haven’t posted for far too long. Shortly after my last post, a lot changed in my life. Throughout the autumn of 2015, there were long conversations and rounds of trying to figure out things before I parted ways with a former long-term partner that December. I found an awesome new job as a development coordinator at a local nonprofit in November 2015, which has given me a host of new skills and opportunities. It also has resulted in a much deeper understanding of how non-profits work. As I have grown personally and professionally and held dialogues with friends, colleagues, and acquaintances over the last year and a half, the core ideals of Sunflower Village have remained steady, while my understanding about how to manifest this dream into reality have been refined, clarified, and re-imagined.

One of the critical developments has been my learning about the roles of boards of directors in non-profits. During the discussion groups of 2015, I imagined that the board could simply be comprised of all of the villagers. There are three reasons I have moved away from this:

  • 1)The role of the board is more extensive and ongoing than I previously understood.
  • 2) I realized that some residents may not have the capacity or enthusiasm that is critical for an engaged, working board
  • 3) Sunflower VIllage needs the perspectives and expertise of non-residents who are passionate about the mission

As I have come to better understand how boards work, I have somewhat redesigned the organizational structure that the group created in 2015. I also further worked out detail on sharing labor and money.

Another shift is the decision to base Sunflower Village in southern Vermont. This region is conducive to the creation/development of this kind of intentional community for multiple reasons: the relative affordability of land in the quantities desirable, the cultural values of the region, the agricultural climate, the abundance of natural resources (such as land, fresh water, firewood), and legal policies and practices conducive to a community of tiny houses.

Vermont is a predominantly rural, low-population state, which still has a tradition of small-scale agriculture and gardening. Many of the towns are small, and like so many rural areas, are experiencing challenges of a shrinking and aging population as young people seek education and opportunities that rural areas presently struggle to offer. While being somewhat removed from large urban centers such as Boston & NYC, can access both of these centers via the I-91 highway, meaning it is only about 2 ½ -3 hours to Boston and 3 ½ -4 hours to NYC.

A third major development has been the addition of Joy Auciello to the Triad. I met Joy as a fellow student at Marlboro College. Many people have contributed to Sunflower Village over the last 10 years. Joy is one of the few to take her own initiative in furthering its manifestation, as she is presently doing through her research and projects in as she completes her MBA in Managing for Sustainability at Marlboro College’s later this spring. I am very excited to have her working with me. Joy does a lot to deepen and expand my thinking, and we are getting practical things done to get things going.

I am starting to reconnect to people to share the present vision for Sunflower Village, understand what concerns and interests people, and how people want to become involved, whether as Board Members, founding resident Villagers, or Supporters (who don’t presently wish to live at Sunflower Village, but are otherwise interested. Feel free to share here what you think at this point!

Thanks for reading!

 

Movement! March 1, 2013

Filed under: nonprofit development,organization — Saera @ 8:38 pm

It has been far too long since this blog was updated, and I’m excited to tell you about what’s been going on. In December, I followed up with a few people who had previously expressed a willingness to be on the Board of Directors. We held our first meeting in late January and began the process of getting on the same page. I shared a few documents I’ve been working on, including a draft of the mission statement and our bylaws. We spent some of the time discussing our format as a board. I also shared what I anticipated some of our first programs could be, as well as thoughts on some programs concepts for later in our journey. We concluded by setting our next time to meet.

In Janurary, I also reconnected with a wonderful mentor in Alternative Economic studies whom I originally met in Dorchester, MA through another organization. Angela is encouraging and supportive as well as brilliant in her own right. She gave me a great book, Alternatives to Economic Globalization, which was an exciting and inspiring read on many ways besides global capitalism/neoliberalism to approach economic function. At present, she is back in Sardinia, Italy as a visiting scholar, sharing how Land Trusts are being used in the US. I got to talk with her at one point via Skype, and we have exchanged some lovely emails.

In February, our Board reconfigured itself a bit. We had to reschedule our Board Meeting. I’m excited for our second meeting. I have the benefit of good amounts of time to think about the Sunflower Village Initiative while my hands are busy at work, and I’m preparing to write more on the vision of the nonprofit.

More soon!

 

Patience, Compromise, Focus October 11, 2011

Patience, compromise and focus seem to be the order of the day.

A couple of weeks ago, I was at the University and I was fortunate enough to snag a few minutes with the professor I respect most. We had a conversation about where I’m at and where I’m determined to go. I told him my thoughts and plans. He understands me well. He helped me re-recognize that my classic obstacles is that “you want it, you want it all, and it you want it yesterday”. He helped me set it straight. “Get yourself the job, give yourself time to get used to it. Build your living community. It is going to take time and all of your energy as it’s no easy thing. THEN when that is somewhat established, you can do your non-profit or maybe go to grad-school. But if you try to do everything at once, you aren’t going to do any of it well”. This is hard stuff for me to hear, but I can listen and get myself to change when this man says it. It works: that its, it helps me polish myself so I can accomplish what I want to. So I keep going back, tears or no (usually some tears).

The other thing that Prof and I talked about, echoed in conversations with others I trust and respect, is the need for compromise. Hypothetically it is clear to me that I cannot wake up tomorrow in the world of which I dream. I have to compromise with the world as it exists, or I will become paralyzed in dreamer’s theory and never able to move it to action. The tricky part is how to compromise without feeling like I’m selling out. What is key here is to remember that I have a transformative drive. That is to say, my desire to build a better society is not affected by what work I do or who I do it for. Still, there are some things which I would find entirely too hypocritical in light of what I have concluded so far, such as working for a fast-food, factory-farm supplied establishment.

Recent events on a national scale, the Occupy movements, are something of growing interest to me. At first I felt only mildly interested – up til now, widespread perception and my personal experience of the effectiveness of demonstrations is that they don’t seem to accomplish much. Partly because in contemporary decades, they are too often too easy to ignore and dismiss. This time it is different. The protests on Wall Street have spread to other cities and towns across the USA. It is exciting to see so many Americans uniting around this kind of action. It is sprouting critically needed dialogues, between people’s convergent needs and suffering, and their diverse voices and experiences and concerns. My appreciation for this dialogue is accompanied by adrenaline rushes of excitement, this is the kind of dialogue which makes me feel happy, hopeful, excited.

This morning, a convoluted thought process brought me around to an epiphany about how my personal struggles are reflected on a wider scale, and vice versa. It was a torrent of thoughts and visualizations and experiences, and suddenly I found that my brain had rewired to allow a broader perspective, for compromise. For a long time, I have been very suspicious of all corporations. But what I came around to this morning was that we now have corporations which empower us. Without the companies that develop and make my laptop, my phone, my internet service, etc, I would be a lot further away from my dreams. I would not be now sharing this post with you, or having dialogues between towns or states or countries at the ease of touching my finger to a button or a screen. Some of these companies don’t just provide world-changers with tools, but themselves offer a renewed hope to families and individuals. There are companies with real benefits (not that fake bare-minimum stuff), with unions and potential for living wages. That’s not to say that we should not Occupy, ask questions, have dialogues. I still aspire for new economic systems (note the s), which provide greater stability and self-reliance in Americans. But we need some of those corporations, and I need to start being nicer to those. Wall Street is not going to go away tomorrow, and we’d be in some trouble if it did. I want to be clear, and encourage protesters to be clear, about which corporations (I will not say “who”) we protest, and why. I’m not mad at AT&T

Patience, me. Job first, practice wise compromises, continue dialogues and building relationships.  Patience world-changers, non-violent social revolution is needs be a slow process, full of dialogue and self-reflection. It also needs meaningful, sustained action and well-considered development of alternatives. Keep it up!

 

 

Productive in the World July 7, 2011

I went to DELA (Don’t Eat Lunch Alone) in Springfield for the first time. I found out about it through the Pioneer Valley Local First group on Linkedin. If you aren’t familiar with the concept, Don’t Eat Lunch Alone is the idea that lunch can be used as valuable networking time. This group brings together people to discuss ideas relating to business and employment. I found the discussion interesting and I met some people who I think will be helpful with the Sunflower Village Initiative, so I’m glad I went and I’m likely to go again.

I also went to the Forbes Library and wandered around until I realized what I wanted to look at: Treehouse architecture. I found two books, one of which I know I’ve seen before used and desperately want to buy but can’t. So I read that until the library closed. After  picking up my partner from work, we came home and I grabbed a quick dinner of canned soup and grilled cheese, then left again. I went to a volunteer training for Habitat for Humanity. Now I can volunteer on sites for them, not just stuff envelopes. 😀 I’m really excited about the non-profit skills I’m going to learn from them, in addition to house-building skills.

 

Organization June 9, 2011

Filed under: organization — Saera @ 12:57 am
Tags: ,

While I was a student, I had opportunities to gather information about local organizations and businesses with goals and values similar to the Sunflower Village Initiatives. However, as I was focused on my education and unable to devote the time to them, I filed them away to be researched later. This past week, I cleaned out my files. I began creating a database of these entities, which in keeping with what I have been learning from Katie G., I am terming Allies. I plan on researching these Allies to see how our values align and what kinds of relationships we can build as SVI grows.

I have long struggled with being specific enough about how the Sunflower Village Initiative will work. So one of the other major things I am working on is thoroughly describing the Initiative: how it will work, what programs it will engage in, who it is for, and why it is needed. I am also brainstorming ideas for making more effective use of Board Members capacities and time as well as for involving individuals who want to be volunteers or members of the Initiative. As this becomes more coherent, I am likely to share some of it here to disseminate the ideas and to receive critiques. Look for more soon!

 

Dialogue, Writing, India, Gardening July 12, 2010

Chris and Marcia came over to chant this evening, and it was wonderful to hear from them about their dreams and ideas, particularly from Chris. They listened to me too. Although the phrase “make the impossible possible” didn’t come up so directly, much of the discussion was about how we actually go about doing that, about dividing huge dreams into smaller, connected goals that make the dream seem more possible, and therefore more exciting and tangible.

I’ve been doing some of this already. Through a book on How to Start a Nonprofit, I’ve been working through some important details and motivations. I’ve typed up a bunch of it, and perhaps I’ll post some of it too, with a little more editing.

I don’t know how much I’ve written about it here, but I’m working towards spending next semester studying in India. The program I’m in is called Sustainable Development and Social Change, through SIT, (The School for International Training, located in Vermont). The connection between this and the Sunflower Village Initiative is that I believe that my thinking and actions about SVI will be clarified through this program. By making a connection to Sustainable Development and Social Change in India, I will strengthen, from experience, the ability for intentional communities to positively impact interactions with impoverished countries, as well as making the village inclusive of multiple cultural experiences and non-white perspectives. So in my application for the program, I wrote a good deal about how I think that the program will do this. Something else I can add here.

My friend Mamta is gone for a few weeks, and she has offered me a great opportunity. I get to water and harvest her vegetables while she’s gone! I go the first time tomorrow. I’m going to bring home some basil, and hopefully a tomato or two will be ready! I’m sure some zucchini will be set, since they were coming ripe last week. It will be good to get out and do some garden work. I haven’t done much gardening in a long time, so this will feel wonderful, and save us some money too!