Sunflowervillager's Blog

Growing into community

Kickoff Meeting + Mystery Seeds! May 3, 2017

We had a great board kickoff meeting today! Four of us met this evening. It was cool to have three awesome supporters meet each other at last. We discussed where things are with Sunflower Village right now. We’re working on our strategy to apply for nonprofit status, and we’re looking for people who are interested in Sunflower Village, whether they’d like to think about becoming a villager or just have an interest in intentional communities, economic justice, sustainable living, or tiny houses.

Our next meeting is in June, but we’re already planning the conversations we’re going to have between now and then, about nonprofits, organizational structure, and sustainability.

On an earthy note, yesterday I finally got my hands in the dirt and did some planting. I have seeds set for basil, Purple Cherokee tomatoes, Brown Berry cherry tomatoes, coriander, and dill from the landlord I had in Amherst. But best of all are the mystery sunflowers. I saved the seed on the head of a sunflower I grew in 2015, but I have no idea which variety it was. I’m excited to see how they and all the Sunflower Village seeds I’ve been planting since then bloom this year. Mystery Sunflower Seeds planted 5-2-17.jpg

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New Perspectives January 24, 2017

Filed under: geography,nonprofit development,organization — Saera @ 11:03 pm

I haven’t posted for far too long. Shortly after my last post, a lot changed in my life. Throughout the autumn of 2015, there were long conversations and rounds of trying to figure out things before I parted ways with a former long-term partner that December. I found an awesome new job as a development coordinator at a local nonprofit in November 2015, which has given me a host of new skills and opportunities. It also has resulted in a much deeper understanding of how non-profits work. As I have grown personally and professionally and held dialogues with friends, colleagues, and acquaintances over the last year and a half, the core ideals of Sunflower Village have remained steady, while my understanding about how to manifest this dream into reality have been refined, clarified, and re-imagined.

One of the critical developments has been my learning about the roles of boards of directors in non-profits. During the discussion groups of 2015, I imagined that the board could simply be comprised of all of the villagers. There are three reasons I have moved away from this:

  • 1)The role of the board is more extensive and ongoing than I previously understood.
  • 2) I realized that some residents may not have the capacity or enthusiasm that is critical for an engaged, working board
  • 3) Sunflower VIllage needs the perspectives and expertise of non-residents who are passionate about the mission

As I have come to better understand how boards work, I have somewhat redesigned the organizational structure that the group created in 2015. I also further worked out detail on sharing labor and money.

Another shift is the decision to base Sunflower Village in southern Vermont. This region is conducive to the creation/development of this kind of intentional community for multiple reasons: the relative affordability of land in the quantities desirable, the cultural values of the region, the agricultural climate, the abundance of natural resources (such as land, fresh water, firewood), and legal policies and practices conducive to a community of tiny houses.

Vermont is a predominantly rural, low-population state, which still has a tradition of small-scale agriculture and gardening. Many of the towns are small, and like so many rural areas, are experiencing challenges of a shrinking and aging population as young people seek education and opportunities that rural areas presently struggle to offer. While being somewhat removed from large urban centers such as Boston & NYC, can access both of these centers via the I-91 highway, meaning it is only about 2 ½ -3 hours to Boston and 3 ½ -4 hours to NYC.

A third major development has been the addition of Joy Auciello to the Triad. I met Joy as a fellow student at Marlboro College. Many people have contributed to Sunflower Village over the last 10 years. Joy is one of the few to take her own initiative in furthering its manifestation, as she is presently doing through her research and projects in as she completes her MBA in Managing for Sustainability at Marlboro College’s later this spring. I am very excited to have her working with me. Joy does a lot to deepen and expand my thinking, and we are getting practical things done to get things going.

I am starting to reconnect to people to share the present vision for Sunflower Village, understand what concerns and interests people, and how people want to become involved, whether as Board Members, founding resident Villagers, or Supporters (who don’t presently wish to live at Sunflower Village, but are otherwise interested. Feel free to share here what you think at this point!

Thanks for reading!

 

Movement! March 1, 2013

Filed under: nonprofit development,organization — Saera @ 8:38 pm

It has been far too long since this blog was updated, and I’m excited to tell you about what’s been going on. In December, I followed up with a few people who had previously expressed a willingness to be on the Board of Directors. We held our first meeting in late January and began the process of getting on the same page. I shared a few documents I’ve been working on, including a draft of the mission statement and our bylaws. We spent some of the time discussing our format as a board. I also shared what I anticipated some of our first programs could be, as well as thoughts on some programs concepts for later in our journey. We concluded by setting our next time to meet.

In Janurary, I also reconnected with a wonderful mentor in Alternative Economic studies whom I originally met in Dorchester, MA through another organization. Angela is encouraging and supportive as well as brilliant in her own right. She gave me a great book, Alternatives to Economic Globalization, which was an exciting and inspiring read on many ways besides global capitalism/neoliberalism to approach economic function. At present, she is back in Sardinia, Italy as a visiting scholar, sharing how Land Trusts are being used in the US. I got to talk with her at one point via Skype, and we have exchanged some lovely emails.

In February, our Board reconfigured itself a bit. We had to reschedule our Board Meeting. I’m excited for our second meeting. I have the benefit of good amounts of time to think about the Sunflower Village Initiative while my hands are busy at work, and I’m preparing to write more on the vision of the nonprofit.

More soon!